Archive for the ‘Animals’ Category

Wordless Wednesday

Dragon Fly HD Rain Wallpaper

Source: Webgranth.com

Wordless Wednesday

cat_versus_mantis

Source:  Photoboto.com

Wordless Wednesday

Source: Favim.com

Friday’s Fun Fact

A researcher at the Universityof Arkansas has named a species of crustacean after late reggae music legend Bob Marley. Gnathia marleyi feeds on blood and infests certain fish that live among the coral reefs of the Caribbean Sea. The scientist that made the discovery says “I named this species, which is truly a natural wonder, after Marley because of my respect and admiration for Marley’s music.” Hmmmmmm…..not sure if I would want a blood sucking parasite named after me. Too bad you don’t get to reject the name if you decide you don’t want to be remembered in this way. Would you think it was an honor to have a species named after you, no matter what its role in the environment? Or would you pass on being honored in this way?

Source: Live Science

The Georgia Aquarium thanks Betty White for being a “friend”

Anyone who knows me well knows that the Golden Girls is by far still my favorite television show. So this article was a no-brainer for today’s feature. The Georgia Aquarium has named its new dolphin mascot “Betty” after Betty White. A lifelong animal lover and conservationist this honor was not bestowed upon White without justification. For example, White was so moved by a visit to the Aquarium in 2010 that she dedicated a chapter in her book to the visit.

She believes that “Places like [the aquarium] are sending such a wonderful message. I always get a little discouraged when people say about zoos and aquariums, ‘They shouldn’t take animals out of their natural environment.’ But what have we done to their natural environment? It doesn’t exist anymore. The people have taken over. But a facility like this, they’re sending a message – appreciate the wildlife.”

Go Betty, thank you for being a friend (to the animals)!!!!!

Source: Ecorazzi

Photo: Zoo and Aquarium Visitor

Like this on Facebook

Wordless Wednesday

Ralph Lee Hopkins: Earth Day

Source: SiongChin.com

Like this on Facebook

Does local honey reduce seasonal allergies?

I have always heard that consuming local honey helps to reduce the effects of seasonal allergies. I have yet to test this theory but I’m sure many of you have.

It is said that since local bees pollinate local flowers, small amounts of the pollen prevalent in your area will end up in the honey. Eating the honey on a regular basis will help build up your immunity to these allergens.

It sounds like a pretty solid theory. Not only are you supporting local businesses by buying honey from producers in your community, it also reduces emissions from the transport of honey. This is a win-win for the economy and the environment.

But how much honey would I need to consume? How long would this take? Let me know what you think? Do you believe this really works….why or why not?

Source: Mother Nature Network

Photo: Cltampa.com

Wordless Wednesday

Turtle eating plastic

Source: Mother Nature Network

Are there differences between farmed versus wild salmon when it comes to health?

Emagazine.com  features an “Earth Talk” column which answers questions about the environment. A Sustainable Life will occasionally share some of these Q&A’s with you.

Dear EarthTalk: What are the differences between farmed versus wild salmon when it comes to human and environmental health?

 — Greg Diamond, Nashville, TN

Salmon farming, which involves raising salmon in containers placed under water near shore, began in Norway about 50 years ago and has since caught on in the U.S., Ireland, Canada, Chile and the United Kingdom. Due to the large decline in wild fish from overfishing, many experts see the farming of salmon and other fish as the future of the industry. On the flip side, many marine biologists and ocean advocates fear such a future, citing serious health and ecological implications with so-called “aquaculture.” George Mateljan, founder of Health Valley Foods, says that farmed fish are “far inferior” to their wild counterparts. “Despite being much fattier, farmed fish provide less usable beneficial omega 3 fats than wild fish,” he says. Indeed, U.S. Department of Agriculture research bears out that the fat content of farmed salmon is 30-35 percent by weight while wild salmons’ fat content is some 20 percent lower, though with a protein content about 20 percent higher. And farm-raised fish contain higher amounts of pro-inflammatory omega 6 fats instead of the preponderance of healthier omega 3s found in wild fish. “Due to the feedlot conditions of aquafarming, farm-raised fish are doused with antibiotics and exposed to more concentrated pesticides than their wild kin,” reports Mateljan. He adds that farmed salmon are given a salmon-colored dye in their feed “without which their flesh would be an unappetizing grey color.”  

Ocean advocates would like to end fish farming and instead put resources into reviving wild fish populations. Pictured: a salmon farming operation in Chile.
© Sam Beebe, EcoTrust

Some aquaculture proponents claim that fish farming eases pressure on wild fish populations, but most ocean advocates disagree. To wit, one National Academy of Sciences study found that sea lice from fish farming operations killed up to 95 percent of juvenile wild salmon migrating past them. And two other studies—one in western Canada and the other in England—found that farmed salmon accumulate more cancer-causing PCBs and dioxins than wild salmon due to pesticides circulating in the ocean that get absorbed by the sardines, anchovies and other fish that are ground up as feed for the fish farms. A recent survey of U.S. grocery stores found that farmed salmon typically contains 16 times the PCBs found in wild salmon; other studies in Canada, Ireland and Great Britain reached similar conclusions. 

Another problem with fish farms is the liberal use of drugs and antibiotics to control bacterial outbreaks and parasites. These primarily synthetic chemicals spread out into marine ecosystems just from drifting in the water column as well as from fish feces. In addition, millions of farmed fish escape fish farms every year around the world and mix into wild populations, spreading contaminants and disease accordingly. Ocean advocates would like to end fish farming and instead put resources into reviving wild fish populations. But given the size of the industry, improving conditions would be a start. Noted Canadian environmentalist David Suzuki says that aquaculture operations could use fully enclosed systems that trap waste and do not allow farmed fish to escape into the wild ocean. As for what consumers can do, Suzuki recommends buying only wild-caught salmon and other fish. Whole Foods and other natural foods and high end grocers, as well as concerned restaurants, will stock wild salmon from Alaska and elsewhere

Do you know whether your seafood is wild caught or farm raised? Does it matter to you?

Wordless Wednesday

 

melting ice caps spitting

Source: Flavell Blog