Archive for September, 2012

Meatless Monday

Here are some fun facts about our Meatless Monday veggie of the day, Broccoli. Broccoli is one of the healthiest green vegetables. It’s versatile, inexpensive and tastes great.

Broccoli has been cultivated for more than 2000 years. Cultivation is believed to have originated in Calabria, Italian. This is the origin of the Italian name “Calabrese.”

Broccoli, Cauliflower, Cabbage, Brussel Sprouts, and Kale are all of the exact same species of plant! Many folks don’t believe this as they look so different…. but how does a Poodle compare to a Great Dane?

The name “broccoli” comes for the Latin word brachium, which means “branch,” or “arm.” Broccoli has only been grown in America for about 200 years and for much of that time it was considered exotic. Until the 1920’s, broccoli was virtually unknown by most Americans. Broccoli production in the U.S. increased 700% between 1971 and 1991 and is continuing today.

Broccoli is a “cool weather” crop and does poorly in hot weather. Because it is tolerant to cold, it is available year ’round in the U.S.

The American film producer, Albert R. Broccoli, (April 5, 1909 – June 27, 1996) famous for producing the James Bond movies, claimed his family invented Broccoli. This has been judged a highly dubious claim by most experts.

Broccoli comes in a variety of colors, ranging from deep sage all the way to dark green and purplish-green.

Tom “Broccoli” Landers  holds the current world record for eating 1 pound of broccoli in 92 seconds.

Source: Swampy Acres Farm
Photo: Electric Tree House

Wordless Wednesday

rainbows and dust

Source: Photoboto

Meatless Monday

Today we continue the “Easy ways to eat more veggies (and fruits)” series, featuring tips on how to get move veggies into your busy lifestyle.

Find veggie alternatives for a less-healthful ingredient. Instead of serving tacos in flour tortillas, serve them in iceberg lettuce leaves or artisan lettuce “cups” (think lettuce wrap). Instead of stuffing tuna salad into a pita, serve it over a green salad. Load up that omelet with diced tomatoes, onions, and bell peppers and scale back the cheese.

Source: Tammy’s Recipes

Wordless Wednesday

Bamboo Forest

Source: PhotoBoto.com

Meatless Monday

Today we continue the “Easy ways to eat more veggies (and fruits)” series, featuring tips on how to get move veggies into your busy lifestyle.

Today’s Tip:

Make soup; sneak them in. Especially during the fall and winter, it’s comforting to come home to a bowl of vegetable soup or another healthy soup filled with veggies. Or if you’re not having soup, there are lots of other recipes that can handle having a few extra veggies thrown in as well, especially if it’s something in season and you’re bursting at the seams with extras.

Source: Tammy’s Recipes

Feature Friday

ATide laundry detergent podss a mother of a young child I thought this was something worthy of sharing with the LIFE community. It seems that there is an alarming new trend of children being poisoned after eating colorful, bite-sized and delicious-looking laundry detergent packs. It seems that  the squishy/colorful/bite-sized/delicious-looking nature of  Tide Pods is just too tempting for many curious tykes to resist. Reports of toddlers mistaking the capsules for candy, eating them and falling gravely ill continue to rise. Ken Wahl, medical director for the IllinoisPoisonCenter states: “I’ve never seen a consumer product that had that degree of injury in a child.” If you purchase laundry pods please make sure they’re stored in child-proof containers or out of the reach of your little ones.

Source: Mnn.com

 

Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes

Emagazine.com  features an “Earth Talk” column which answers questions about the environment. A Sustainable Life will occasionally share some of these Q&A’s with you.

Dear EarthTalk: I couldn’t believe my ears: “genetically engineered mosquitoes?” Why on Earth would they be created? And I understand there are plans to release them into the wild?

Yes it’s true, genetically engineered mosquitoes, which were bred in the lab to transmit a gene during the reproductive process that kills their offspring, have already been used on an experimental basis in three countries—the Cayman Islands, Malaysia and Brazil—to counteract the quickly spreading mosquito-borne viral infection dengue fever. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that as many as 100 million cases of humans infected with dengue fever—which causes a severe flu-like illness and can in certain instances be fatal—occur annually in more than 100 tropical and sub-tropical countries.

Oxitec first released some of the genetically modified mosquitoes in the Cayman Island in the Caribbean in 2009, much to the surprise of the international community and environmental advocates, many of whom are opposed to genetic engineering in any of its forms due to the unknown and unintended side effects that unleashing transgenic organisms into the world could cause.

In Brazil, where the largest experiments have been carried out to date, the government is backing a new facility designed to breed millions of genetically engineered mosquitoes to help keep dengue fever at bay.

Dengue fever isn’t considered to be a big problem in the U.S. as yet. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that most of the dengue fever cases showing up in the continental U.S. are among those who have travelled to sub-tropical and tropical areas of the world. Still, WHO reports that the incidence of dengue fever in the U.S. has increased some thirty-fold over the last half century.

A proposal by Oxitec to test its transgenic mosquitoes in the Florida Keys has some locals upset. In April 2012, the town of Key West passed an ordinance prohibiting the release of the mosquitoes pending further testing on possible implications for the environment. In the meantime, Oxitec has applied to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a patent on their mosquito and permission to release them in the U.S.

Tell me what you think about this……