Archive for February, 2011

Recylemania

Congratulations to John Wheeler, Grounds Director, winner of Tuesday’s trivia question. It takes approximately 60 days for a recycled can to return to the shelf.

 Recycling Tip of the Day:

Buy rechargeable batteries. It takes 1,000 regular batteries to equal the lifespan of one rechargeable battery. When you are discarding your batteries, recycle them.

 Source: EpOnline

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Wordless Wednesday

Source: Southern Studies 

Recyclemania trivia question: How many days does it take recycled cans to return to the shelf?

Comment on yesterday’s post with the correct answer for a chance to win a prize from the Office of Sustainability. The winner will by randomly chosen from correct answers submitted by 5 pm (EST) on February 24, 2011. (Note: Prize must be picked up in the Office of Sustainability).

Reyclemania’s Recycling Audit

The Office of Sustainability would like thank Mrs. Taz Graves (Life University Physical Plant) and Mr. David Frame (Coca-Cola) for helping with today’s recycling audit. During this audit Mr. Frame took a look at our overall recycling program and identified areas for improvement and offered invaluable tips to help LIFE reach its sustainability goals. Working together we hope to quickly implement the recommendations from the audit and increase recycling throughout the University.

Recyclemania trivia question: How many days does it take recycled cans to return to the shelf?

Comment on this post with the correct answer for a chance to win a prize from the Office of Sustainability. The winner will by randomly chosen from correct answers submitted by 5 pm (EST) on February 24, 2011. (Note: Prize must be picked up in the Office of Sustainability).

Meatless Food for Thought

 

Meatless Monday featured this interview with Daphne Oz, author of The Dorm Room Diet, a national bestseller that helps college students create healthy eating habits.  

The introduction to The Dorm Room Diet welcomes readers of varying nutritional backgrounds. How can young people change their eating habits despite an upbringing that didn’t include healthy dining choices?

The trick to forming healthy dining habits, because or in spite of the habits you were raised with, is to live in the moment. Make every eating decision consciously. When you do splurge, just make sure you’ve actually made a decision to indulge, and are not quickly cramming food into your mouth simply out of habit, boredom – or because you think no one is looking (your waistline will be!).

Proper nutrition during your college years can have benefits beyond your immediate health. How do healthy eating habits impact academic success?

The blood sugar spike that occurs when you ingest a ton of simple carbohydrates gives a huge jolt of jittery energy, followed almost immediately by a blood sugar crash that can leave you exhausted and craving another sugar fix. Obviously, this makes focusing on classwork incredibly difficult. Making sure you are getting plenty of fruits and veggies, complex carbohydrates, proteins, and good fats can aid in mental acuity, information retention, and concentration.
In your book, you write that students should consume three small servings of protein a day, but you also state that only one serving should come from meat. What other foods offer protein and what benefits do they hold over meat products?

The next time you’re weighing whether you “need” to eat meat for your third meal of the day, keep in mind that Americans, on the whole, get up to 5 times more protein than they need. Also, meat isn’t the only source of protein, and you do NOT need it in your diet (certainly not on an every day basis). Consider this: A 6-ounce broiled porterhouse steak has 38 grams of protein, but it also has 44 grams of fat!

Some of my favorite meatless protein sources from my college days are kidney beans, garbanzo beans (chickpeas), lowfat cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt, peanut butter, protein bars, tofu/seitan jerky, cooked lentils, spinach and soy crisps.

What tips do you have for students who are trying to make healthy meatless choices?

I would say that the most important thing is to plan your meals. If you can, pack your own food, but it is also possible to get a healthful variety in the cafeteria. Most colleges provide extensive salad bars, as well as cooked meatless options (whole grains, vegetable stir fry, sandwiches, etc).

Many students find trips to dining hall overwhelming. Do you have any tips for successfully navigating the wide range of choices?

I certainly found adjusting to cafeteria eating to be one of the more difficult transitions I had to make. You’re confronted with so many options! It’s not so hard though once you come to understand that food is meant for fuel, not a social lubricant or time waster. Establishing a healthy eating menu early on in the school year can spare you some of the stress of decision making while you’re still getting your bearings.

One fail safe way to make sure you stay on track is to choose your salad items first: pile your plate high with lettuce, fresh veggies, beans and legumes. After you’ve made your salad choice, go back for the less healthy options, and take half portions. Eat the salad first, then eat what you like of the rest of your meal.

Thankfully LIFE students can always find healthy food selections in the Socrates Cafe. Since the cafe opened do you find yourself choosing healthier food options? Have you tried foods that you wouldn’t ordinarily order…or had never eaten before?

What is a CSA?

A CSA is Community Supported Agriculture program (CSA) is where consumers buy a “subscription” from a local farmer just as you would a newspaper or magazine. For your weekly subscription, you receive a share of fresh, locally grown fruit, vegetables, eggs and or meats throughout the growing season.

This relationship supports the farmers by ensuring that their crops will be purchased and helps consumers by providing a product that is fresh, nutritious and locally grown. While grocery stores don’t have seasons, by participating in a CSA you are guaranteed to have foods that are in season and have retained more of their nutritional value.

mixed veggies

The CSA program at Life University (LIFE) was recently featured in Atlanta Magazine. One of the few CSA’s on Atlanta area campuses, our CSA program is a joint venture between Split Cedar Farm  in Henry County and the LIFE Community.

For more information on LIFE’s CSA contact seedsoflife@life.edu

 Sources: Illinois Farm Direct, Local Harvest

Photo Source: University of Maryland

Wordless Wednesday

Source: Trash Beautiful Trash

Congratulations to Dr. Kathryn Haag, Director of LIFEforce1000, the winner of Wednesday’s trivia question.  The energy saved from recycling one aluminum can is enough to run a television for 3 hours.

Recyclemania

 

Recyclemania Tip:

Before you haul your unwanted household items to the dumpster, consider donating them to charity. There are numerous charities, schools and churches that welcome donations. Make a pledge to yourself that no useful items will be thrown away until you have researched options for donating it first.

Remember you have until 5pm (EST) today to answer the trivia question from yesterday.

RecycleMania trivia question: The energy saved from recycling one aluminum can is enough to run a television for how many hours?

Comment on yesterday’s post with the correct answer for a chance to win a prize from the Office of Sustainability. The winner will by randomly chosen from correct answers submitted by 5 pm (EST) on February 15, 2011. (Note: Prize must be picked up in the Office of Sustainability).